Racial divisions will remain a permanent part of America's future as long as the media tells black people that the criminal justice system is stacked against them, says Ben Shapiro, author of "Bullies: How the Left's Culture of Fear and Intimidation Silences America."

According to a 2013 report released by the Missouri attorney general, African-Americans are highly over-represented in crime statistics. They accounted for 93% of arrests after traffic stops, 92% of searches and 86% of traffic stops in Ferguson.

"The cure is not to tell people that the criminal justice system is stacked against them; the cure is to minimize criminal activity and identify lawbreaking officers and prosecute them," says Shaprio, who is also editor-in-chief at the online magazine TruthRevolt.

Shapiro says he is more concerned about another way America may decline in the future: the erosion of values like hard work, marriage and education.

"The reality is that if you want to escape poverty, you only have to make a couple of decisions: Finish school, don't have a baby out of wedlock and get a job -- that's it," he says.

Assumption No. 4: We need to get past our racial differences

Whenever a racial flashpoint erupts in America, weary people on both sides of the issue tend to ask the same questions:

When are we going to get past race? Why can't we all just be Americans? Can't we all just get along?

But what if we shouldn't just get along? What if the constant conflict among different races and points of view is, in some ways, good for America?

That's the perspective of Anthony P. Carnevale, director of the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce. Carnevale is an authority on affirmative action in higher education and an economist.

He says society can't have diversity without disruption and that scholars know from research that "from that tension comes great creativity."

The trick is to harness that tension for good, Carnevale says.

"If you have only white men sitting in a room making decisions, you get low-quality decisions and very little change," he says. "If you include a woman and a minority in that room, the whole process changes. You get more quality and innovation."

He says America is a successful country partly because its citizens never stop arguing. Those clashes force people to think, abandon what no longer works and innovate.

"Quiet, peaceful communities rarely invent things," Carnevale says. "The Romans failed because they kept marrying each other and they all looked the same. Their habits became set. There was no challenge to the elites."

Protests like those in Ferguson will continue because many whites still believe that "what happens to somebody is about them, and is not about the circumstances in which they live."

Yet eventually there will be a "third wave" of racial minorities, Carnevale says. And those people will bring a different sensibility to the way we regard race and class.

"There are two ways to change a democracy," he says. One is to change its leaders and the other is to change its people.

"And the people are changing."