The group that created national controversy at the border in Murietta, California brought their controversy through El Paso on Sunday in a convoy of vehicles.  The group says they are a coalition of citizens with a deep concern for what they call "the invasion currently happening."  Several of their vehicles, with USA and flag emblems emblazoned or actually painted onto the vehicles, lined up along I-10 where the interstate was at a standstill.  Approximately a half-dozen police cars were also on site to help quell two groups at odds; those with the convoy protesting border immigration and those who are pro-immigration.  Earlier, police had received reports of shots having been fired near where the standstill took place.  After investigating, police found no probable cause to arrest anyone.  One man, Greg LeClaire, a contractor from a small town just south of Denver told KVIA he joined the convoy because he feels his rights as a "voting legal American citizen" have been violated and that the the refusal to draw a hard line on immigrants is, he ads,"...a concerted effort to just flood the country with left wing voters I mean, its so obvious out in the open I can't believe I don't hear it stated more.

A pro-immigrant woman who works for a nonprofit that provides books free of charge to immigrant children, Ana Reza, held a sign protesting the border convoy.  Reza told KVIA she feels the  group is hateful towards children and that the issue is not clear cut, "Life is not as simple as black and white of doing it legally.  Back in the day when my mom did it legally when she came from Juarez, you know I'm Mexican-American, it was a lot easier than it is now."