EL PASO, Texas -

The final push is on for one of the most exciting elections in recent El Paso history.

Silvestre Reyes vs. Beto O'rourke for the 16th Congressional seat has definitely created a buzz throughout the Sun City as both candidates approach the home stretch.

ABC-7 visited the campaign headquarters of Reyes and O'Rourke on Monday and found a big contrast in the approach to the final day of campaigning.

Reyes' headquarters was ripe with activity while O'Rourke's headquarters was noticeably calmer.

"Just making sure everybody's pumped up for tomorrow," Reyes said as campaign workers rushed around him at his headquarters on Montana Street. "

Meanwhile, at O'Rourke's headquarters in Downtown El Paso, a much different feel.

"We'll just have to trust the voters tomorrow at the polls," O'Rourke said as only a handful of campaign workers worked quietly. "I feel good about the work we've put in so far."

O'Rourke compared his campaign approach to a distance race that is finally winding down.

"This has been run like a marathon," O'Rourke said. "We started nine months ago and we've worked hard each and every day, working seven days a week throughout this, so there's nothing a mad sprint can win at this point."

Reyes favored the big push at the end.

"Everybody understands this isn't over until tomorrow at 7 p.m.," Reyes said. "So we're into the last 32 hours or so to finish this off."

Sunday night on ABC-7 Xtra, two local political experts said early voting numbers, which show a nearly 7,000 voter increase over the 2010 primary election, may mean Reyes is behind heading into election day.

"If you're Congressman Reyes and his team at this point, you're worried," said UTEP professor Dr. Richard Pineda. "(Early voting) numbers indicate a trajectory that is really strong from a challenger and these should be some concern to Reyes' office of great concern going into Tuesday."

Lion Star blogger Jaime Abeytia agreed.

"You don't have 20 percent increase in voters all of a sudden to support an incumbent they probably didn't support previously," Abeytia said. "So I do think the Congressman's race is certainly much closer than they thought, and frankly, I think he's in trouble."

ABC-7 asked Reyes if early voting numbers indicate he's in trouble.

"I don't get a sense we're in trouble," Reyes said, "and you know I think I'm in the best position to evaluate there. Certainly if you go around talking to people there's no sense of panic."

Neither candidate would offer a prediction.

"If I have a gut instinct on this it's that it's gonna be close," O'Rourke said. "So it's just critical each and every person come out and vote tomorrow."