El Paso, Texas -

Boston-area residents remained on high alert Friday evening as investigators searched for the second suspect of the Boston marathon bombings.

"My children have been calling. It's been so scary. I'm so scared someone else will get killed or that something else is going to happen," said Rose White, a Newton resident who spoke with ABC-7 over the phone. Newton neighbors Watertown, where police continued searching for the suspect Friday evening after a violent car chase ended with explosives.

"It happened on Watertown square, two minutes from where I live - the end of my street actually. And I just found out that his brother, the younger one jumped in the car and when he pulled out, ran over his body but he was already dead anyhow. I locked the door. Don't let anyone in. Don't answer the door unless it's a uniform police officer man," said White.

The tight knit community was in chaos much of Friday. A police commander, during a news conference, said "a very, very dangerous man is on the loose." Residents were asked to stay indoors and even after the outdoor ban was lifted, the Governor asked Watertown residents to 'stay vigilant.'
Residents were asked to report suspicious activity, especially unattended packages.

"It's like a war zone. Everything is closed and there's all sorts of bomb squads and so many officers." Former KVIA reporter Jayme Rubenstein is in Sommerville, a close suburb, where he's also getting a sense of the effect this is having on residents. "I always try to avoid the cliché that it's like a movie in your own backyard but you start getting the sense of what it's like. With everyone in Boston walking up to this news and knowing they just need to stay put - the eerie stillness in Boston right now.... Roads that 7-days a week are jam packed with commuters are just dead right now."